awards

2017 Harvey T. Strosberg Essay Prize Winner Announced

Posted by irwinlaw on August 31, 2017 in awards and canadian class action review.

31 August 2017

Harvey T. Strosberg, Q.C. and Irwin Law Inc. are pleased to announce that the winner of the 2017 Harvey T. Strosberg Essay Prize for the best student essay on Class Actions in Canada is Madeleine Brown.

Ms. Brown received her JD from Osgoode Hall Law School in June 2017, where she received the Gurston Allen Prize in Conflict of Laws. She is currently articling at a litigation boutique in Toronto, and teaches negotiation at Osgoode as a member of the “Lawyer as Negotiator” course teaching team. 

Her prize-winning paper, “Our Ageing CPA: It’s Time for Ontario to ‘Opt-In’ to a Modern Global Class-Actions Framework,” will appear in an upcoming issue of the Canadian Class Action Review. She will also receive a prize of $10,000, and has been asked to join the judging panel for next year’s competition.

Lawyer’s Guide to the Forensic Sciences wins 2017 Walter Owen Book Prize

Posted by irwinlaw on August 18, 2017 in awards and law of evidence.

Irwin Law Inc. is extremely pleased to announce that the Walter Owen book prize has been awarded to The Lawyer’s Guide to the Forensic Sciences edited by Caitlin Pakosh! Pakosh will be joining the likes of our previous winners: Ed Ratushny (The Conduct of Public Inquiries, 2011), Ari Kaplan (Pension Law, 2009), and Edgar Gold, Aldo Chircop and Hugh Kindred (Maritime Law, 2005).

The clash of the scientific and legal cultures in the courtroom, though theoretically directed at finding the truth, is marked by tension. This guide provides criminal lawyers, defence and Crown alike, with a macroscopic view of multiple forensic science disciplines, specific to the Canadian legal system and written by Canadian experts.

Evidently, The Lawyer’s Guide to the Forensic Sciences was well-received by both the forensic and legal communities in Canada. The Walter Owen Book Prize Jury affirmed, “Incontestably, this text has become the seminal introductory treatment of the principal forensic sciences; invaluably serving those committed to life in the law either above, or in, the well of a court—both criminal and civil.”

As expressed by Pakosh and previous winners, the Walter Owen Book Prize is competitive to win and an honour to receive. She went on to say, “the contributors and I are thankful that the Foundation for Legal Research has recognized The Lawyer’s Guide to the Forensic Sciences as a piece of excellent legal writing that is an outstanding new contribution to Canadian legal doctrine. Creating the book took a considerable amount of time, dedication, and expertise from a diverse team of thirty-four professionals – we are grateful that our work has received such accolades,” Irwin Law’s Senior Editor Lesley Steeve echoed Pakosh’s sentiments, “I’m so pleased that a book that everyone put so much work into has been recognized by this wonderful award! Congrats to Caitlin — she truly deserves this award.”

As for our readers, you’re in luck! You can still get your copy of the highly acclaimed Lawyer’s Guide to the Forensic Sciences here. Happy reading!

David Vaver and Kent Roach invested into the Order of Canada

Posted by irwinlaw on May 12, 2017 in authors and awards.

Our sincere congratulations to David Vaver and Kent Roach, who were both invested into the Order of Canada today.

From the Governor General of Canada Order of Canada Investiture Ceremony press release:

"Kent Roach has made outstanding contributions to protecting our civil liberties. A long-time professor at the University of Toronto, he is also a skilled litigator who has participated in some of the most significant Charter rights cases of the last few decades. His far-reaching involvement in social justice has spanned forums as diverse as the Ipperwash, Arar and Air India inquiries, as well as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. In recent years, he has also emerged as a leading figure in counterterrorism studies whose voice is among the most influential in contemporary debates on the limits of security."

"David Vaver is Canada’s preeminent scholar of intellectual property law. A professor at Osgoode Hall, professor emeritus at Oxford University, and the former director of the Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre, he has improved society’s ability to contend with the legal implications of technological change. He is relied on by the courts for the balance that his work strikes between the rights of intellectual property holders and users, and he has served as an advisor to governments around the world seeking to modernize their intellectual property regimes."

Announcing the 2017 Harvey T. Strosberg Essay Prize Competition

Posted by irwinlaw on December 7, 2016 in awards and canadian class action review.

7 December 2016

Harvey T. Strosberg, Q.C., Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Class Action Review, and Irwin Law Inc. are pleased to announce the fourteenth annual Harvey T. Strosberg Essay Prize competition. The prize of $10,000 is awarded to an outstanding student paper on Canadian class actions.

The competition is open to all Canadian students enrolled in an undergraduate, graduate, or professional program. The deadline for submissions is April 3, 2017.

For more details, click here.

Canadian Lawyer names Forcese and Roach 2016 Changemakers

Posted by irwinlaw on September 7, 2016 in authors, awards, and national security law.

Congratulations to Craig Forcese and Kent Roach, who have been named as two of the Top 25 Most Influential Changemakers of 2016 by Canadian Lawyer magazine! Here is what the magazine has to say about them:

"This duo more than anyone helped educate the Canadian public on the pitfalls and issues of the previous federal Conservative government’s proposed anti-terrorism laws. Forcese and Roach’s approach to influencing public policy development also changed the way academics contribute it. They ditched traditional models in order to engage in real time on bill C-51, launching a blog about it (antiterrorlaw.ca), publishing their work on the world’s largest open-access database — the Social Science Research Network — sending it to public policy-makers, writing op-eds, and appearing before parliamentary committees. Their book False Security: The Radicalization of Canadian Anti-terrorism, [was] published this fall."

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